• Categories

  • Most Popular Questions

  • Recently Viewed Questions

  • Recent Answers

    How To Make a Digita… on What does a frequency of 100 H…
    Daigrepont on Can an earthquake cause air tu…
    Benedict on How did God come into exi…
    joshua on How does the human body g…
    Ian on How did God come into exi…
  • Recent Questions

  • Blog Stats

    • 2,200,631 hits
  • Visitors since 11-3-08

    counter create hit
  • Terms and Conditions

  • Warning

    We are doing maintenance on this site, so some posts may disappear for a short time. Sorry. Normal service will soon be resumed...
  • Pages

  • February 2008
    M T W T F S S
        Mar »
     123
    45678910
    11121314151617
    18192021222324
    2526272829  
  • Archives

  • Meta

How come no one has ever found the end of a rainbow?

How come no one has ever found the end of a rainbow?
David Reed from Redcar and Cleveland (age 5-14)

Advertisements

One Response

  1. No one has ever found the end of a rainbow because rainbows are actually a full circle!

    The only reason we don’t see the full circle of a rainbow from the ground is because the Earth is in the way and cuts off the rainbow at the horizon. Lots of people see full circle rainbows when they are in aeroplanes or in tall buildings because they are looking down at them and the ground isn’t in the way.

    There are some good videos of full rainbows on YouTube, or you could also have a look on Google images.

    If you would like to find out more about rainbows here are some websites to get you stared: http://www.atoptics.co.uk/bows.htm
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rainbow

    Answered by Laura Janes
    All Wales Hands on Science Project Coordinator

    Laura Studied Physics and Medical Physics BSc at Cardiff University, did her PGCE in science education at Bristol University then taught Physics for 2 years in Duffryn High School, Newport, South Wales. She is now studying part time for her MSc in Communicating Science at the University of Glamorgan where she also coordinates the Hands on Science project which encourages people to study science at university and look at the wide range of different science careers available!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: